Chocolate Cream with Orange
I adapted this gem from my time working at Waterbar. The most amazing thing about this recipe is its versatility. You can swap out the orange for any other flavor: Coffee, Coconut, your favorite spices… Anything that can be infused into cream and pairs well with chocolate will work! The yield is quite large, but it doesn’t seem to scale down well. You could easily fill two 10″ round cakes with what it makes, so I just use what I need and eat the rest with a spoon… For like, a week. Be sure not to overcook the anglaise, or you’ll end up with unsalvageable, soupy, scrambled eggs!
Servings Prep Time
76slices of cake (two 10″ rounds) 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30minutes 8hours
Servings Prep Time
76slices of cake (two 10″ rounds) 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30minutes 8hours
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Peel the zest from the oranges with a vegetable peeler. *Note: You could also use a zester, but it’s easier to strain out later if the pieces are larger.
  2. Heat the milk, cream, and sugar on the stove in heavy-bottomed sauce pot. Stir and heat until sugar is dissolved and the liquid is at a scald, but not boiling. Add your orange zests and cover the pot with a lid. Let steep for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, place your separated egg yolks in a bowl big enough to hold the contents of the pot.
  3. Remove the zest from the liquid using a set of tongs, a fork, or strain them out with a fine mesh sieve. Dealer’s choice, depending on how small your pieces are. While whisking the egg yolks with one hand, slowly pour the hot liquid into the yolks with the other hand. *Note: You want the liquid to heat the egg yolks, but not cook them. Whisking allows for even heat distribution to help prevent the eggs from cooking too soon and scrambling.
  4. Pour the contents of the bowl back into the pot, and set over medium-low heat. Continuously scrape the bottom of the pot with a heat-proof spatula. *Note: This will help prevent the eggs from overcooking at the the bottom.
  5. Heat the liquid to 160F, then STOP. The liquid (now called an anglaise) should look slightly thicker and evenly coat the back of a spoon. Immediately remove the pot from the heat and get ready to strain the anglaise over your chocolate. Don’t let the pot sit for too long, or the eggs will continue to cook! *Note: The proteins in the eggs will coagulate at 160F. We want them hot enough to thicken up the anglaise, but not so hot that they overcook and curdle. If the anglaise gets any hotter than 160F, you end up with the aforementioned unsalvageable, soupy mess.
  6. Strain your anglaise over your chocolate, using a fine mesh sieve. Cover your bowl of chocolate with a lid or large plate, and let sit for 5-10 minutes.
  7. Whisk the hot cream and chocolate mixture until everything is nice and smooth. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  8. Fill your favorite cake and enjoy!